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The Columbine Disaster:

Contrasting a Personal Reflection

The disaster

details

theories

documentary

I had a friend in high school, who by genetic chance happened to be the biggest kid in the school, and that was at a school with a winning football team. My friend enjoyed poetry, drama, and reading. When the coach saw his size, coach said, "Are you going to be on the football team?" To which my friend replied "No!" The coach responded, "Do you want me to tell everybody that you're a faggot?"

So years later when I heard that some boys went berserk and shot up a school and killed a few students and a coach my first thought was, "I wonder if that was the coach who encouraged the kids to pick on those boys?" I hadn't yet heard any more of the story. That was just the scenario that seemed the most obvious.

So How do my recollections compare with the actual event? This question can be summed up in three quotes from those who were there.

Principal DeAngelis
"I have asked the students on occasion, 'The things you've read in the paper - is that happening? Am I just naïve?' And they've said, 'Mr. DeAngelis, we don't see it.'"
E. Todd (Columbine Defensive lineman)
"Columbine is a clean good place except for those rejects. Most kids didn't want them here. They were into witchcraft. They were into voodoo dolls. Sure we teased them. But what do you expect with kids who come to school with weird hairdos and horns on their hats? It's not just jocks; the whole school's disgusted with them. They're a bunch of homos, grabbing each others private parts. If you want to get rid of someone, usually you tease 'em. So the whole school would call them homos, and when they did something sick, we'd tell them, 'You're sick and that's wrong.''
Dylan Klebold (the one shooter)
"I'm going to kill you all. You've been giving us s*** for years."

 

It only takes three quotes to sum up Columbine. An adult to acknowledge that he chose not to see. A student to demonstrate that intolerance and aggression were the modus operandi of their culture, -everybody just assumed it was supposed to be that way. And one hurt student to proclaim he wasn't going to take it any more.

Time Magazine December 20, 1999 p50-51